Margaret Iversen Profane Illuminations History and Theory of Photography Research Centre Spring 2017 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD Thursday 19 January 2017, 6:00-7:30pm Room 120

Walter Benjamin credited the Surrealist movement with ‘a true, creative overcoming of religious illumination’ by replacing it with a kind of ‘profane illumination’. This talk attends to two key moments in the art of producing technically mediated, profane illuminations. They are, first, the innovations of the Surrealist movement itself and, second, Leo Steinberg’s ‘Other Criteria’ with its conception of the picture plane as a receptive surface or, as he put it, ‘a consciousness immersed in the brain of the city’.

 

Thursday 2 February 2017, 6:00-7:30pm

Room B04

Marcia Pointon (Professor Emeritus, University of Manchester, and Research Fellow, Courtauld Institute of Art)

Robert Harris’s Photography at De Beer’s Kimberley Diamond Mine 1875-1890

 

Thursday 27 April 2017, 6:00-7:30

Room 106

Christina Riggs (University of East Anglia)

Photographing Tutankhamun: Photo-objects and the archival afterlives of colonial archaeology

 

Patrizia Di Bello (Dr),
Senior Lecturer, History and Theory of Photography
Birkbeck, University of London,
www.bbk.ac.uk/art-history

www.bbk.ac.uk/arts/research/photography

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Call for Papers 12th European Social Science History Conference Belfast April 4-7, 2018

Call for Papers

12th European Social Science History Conference

Belfast April 4-7, 2018

The ESSHC aims at bringing together scholars interested in explaining historical phenomena using the methods of the social sciences. The conference is characterized by a lively exchange in many small groups, rather than by formal plenary sessions.

The Conference welcomes papers and sessions on any topic and any historical period. It is organized in a large number of networks:

Africa ‑ Antiquity ‑ Asia ‑ Criminal Justice ‑ Culture ‑ Economics ‑ Education and Childhood – Elites and Forerunners ‑ Ethnicity and Migration ‑ Family and Demography – Health and Environment – ‑ Labour ‑ Latin America – Material and Consumer Culture – Middle Ages ‑ Oral History – Politics, Citizenship and Nations – Religion ‑ Rural ‑ Sexuality – Social Inequality – Spatial and Digital History – Science and Technology ‑ Theory – Urban ‑ Women and Gender – World History

The deadline for pre-registration on our website is 1 may 2017.  To send in a proposal please go to the pre-registration form.  For more information on how to send in a proposal please go to guidelines.

The 12th European Social Science History Conference is organized by the International Institute of Social History in co-operation with the Queen’s University (link is external)in Belfast.

https://esshc.socialhistory.org/node/100

PHRC – 2017 Anual Conference

Call for Papers

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to phrc@dmu.ac.uk no later than Friday 27 January 2017.

Diverse Migrations: Photography out of Bounds

Photographic History Research Centre, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK

19-20 June 2016

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter @PHRC_DeMontfort

Conference hashtag #PHRC17

 

The consequences of the expansion of photographic practices around the globe are many and varied. Social interactions through and with analogue and digital photographs and the platforms across which photography is shared and disseminated keep challenging traditional socio-cultural boundaries. For its 2017 conference, Diverse Migrations: Photography out of Bounds, PHRC is particularly interested in how these processes affect peoples whose photographic histories are currently understudied. These may be (but are not limited to) African, Central American and Middle Eastern cultures.

Diverse Migrations: Photography out of Bounds seeks to interrogate what social and other meaningful photographic practices emerge when photographs cross boundaries, and move between individuals, places, and distinct cultural environments. Paper proposals may concentrate on the following themes and other related subject matters:

  • transnational and/or emerging photographic practices
  • cross-cultural knowledge exchange through photography
  • migrations across media
  • sharing and exchanging photographs
  • global forums for photography and its theorisation

Papers are welcome from all career stages.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to phrc@dmu.ac.uk no later than Friday 27 January 2017.

https://photographichistory.wordpress.com/annual-conference-2017/

Tim Satterthwaite (Visiting Lecturer, University of Brighton) Spiritualising the machine: the modernist photography of UHU magazine

History and Theory of Photography Research Centre Autumn 2016

Free and open to all, at 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD

 

Monday 24 October, 6:00-7:30pm

Room 106

The photo-illustrated monthly UHU was at the heart of the progressive photographic culture of Weimar Germany. In a stream of articles and photo-pages in the late 1920s, UHU showcased the work of modernist photographers, such as Albert Renger-Patzsch and Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, alongside the radical new perspectives of scientific and aerial photography. UHU’s modernism offered more, however, than a simple embrace of technological modernity; like the great photographic exhibitions of the period, the magazine sought a reconciliation between the rationalising forces of the machine age and the organic principles of the natural world and traditional life. This talk describes how UHU’s modernist synthesis was expressed through a unifying aesthetic of repetition and regularity. The magazine’s photographs of microscopic plant forms, aerial landscapes, and the textures of urban life, were symbolic of alternative visions of social order – the organic or technocratic principles of an ideal future society.

 

Spiritualising the machine: the modernist photography of UHU magazine – Tim Satterthwaite (Visiting Lecturer, University of Brighton)

Forthcoming events at the Photography Research Centre, Birkbeck

History and Theory of Photography Research Centre

Free and open to all, at 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD

This autumn we welcome at Birkbeck Professor Steve Edwards, who will be also joining the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre, and look forward to two seminars on illustrated magazines:

Spiritualising the machine: the modernist photography of UHU magazine Tim Satterthwaite (Visiting Lecturer, University of Brighton)

When? Monday 24 October, 6:00-7:30pm
Where? Room 106, 43 Gordon Square

The photo-illustrated monthly UHU was at the heart of the progressive photographic culture of Weimar Germany. In a stream of articles and photo-pages in the late 1920s, UHU showcased the work of modernist photographers, such as Albert Renger-Patzsch and Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, alongside the radical new perspectives of scientific and aerial photography. UHU’s modernism offered more, however, than a simple embrace of technological modernity; like the great photographic exhibitions of the period, the magazine sought a reconciliation between the rationalising forces of the machine age and the organic principles of the natural world and traditional life. This talk describes how UHU’s modernist synthesis was expressed through a unifying aesthetic of repetition and regularity. The magazine’s photographs of microscopic plant forms, aerial landscapes, and the textures of urban life, were symbolic of alternative visions of social order – the organic or technocratic principles of an ideal future society.

‘New! Art… Plus Added Social Purpose’: BLOCK and the Periodical Landscape of 1970s British Art History – Samuel Bibby (Association of Art Historians)

‘New! Art… Plus Added Social Purpose’: BLOCK and the Periodical Landscape of 1970s British Art History – Samuel Bibby (Association of Art Historians)

When? Wednesday 16 November, 6:00-7:30pm
Where? Room 106, 43 Gordon Square

This paper sets out to provide an historiographical account of the formation of the British periodical BLOCK, the pioneering magazine dedicated to art, design and visual culture founded by a collective of academics from Middlesex Polytechnic in 1979. But rather than doing so solely through the analysis of it as merely a set of texts, a map of verbal discourse, it instead considers BLOCK within the expanded field of the visual contexts from which it emerged. By specifically positioning it within frameworks of material production, and addressing it in terms of the technologies by which it was reproduced, I argue for a realigned approach to the historiographical study of the so-called ‘new art history’. Through a close reading of John Stezaker’s typographic collage for the back cover of the first issue of BLOCK, I present a picture of the discipline in 1970s Britain engaged as much with the social, political and economic conditions of the time as with the visual and material histories of radical art magazines.

Formally established in 2012, the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre is based in Birkbeck’s School of Arts, and is led by Professor Lynda Neadand Dr Patrizia Di Bello, supported by a steering committee. The Centre has links with museums in London, and supports teaching and research on photography in the School through the MA in History of Art with Photography and MPhil-PhD supervision.

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/arts/research/photography