PhD Studentship: Horace Nicholls: artist-photographer at war

PhD Studentship: Horace Nicholls: artist-photographer at war

University of Brighton – AHRC in collaboration with Imperial War Museums (IWM) and University of Brighton

The project:

Applications are invited for an AHRC-funded PhD at the University of Brighton: “Horace Nicholls: artist-photographer at war”. This is offered under the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership programme. The partner institutions are the University of Brighton and IWM. The studentship will be supervised by Professor Darren Newbury and Professor Francis Hodgson at the University of Brighton, and Hilary Roberts of IWM London. This full-time studentship, which is funded for three years at standard AHRC rates, will begin on 1 October 2016.

Horace W. Nicholls was one of Britain’s best known photographers of the early twentieth century. As one of the world’s first true photojournalists, his work shaped that of succeeding generations. He documented the impact of total war on the British people, and, as Britain’s first official photographer on the Home Front, had unique access, particularly to women war workers. After the war, he became the new Imperial War Museum’s Head of Studio (Chief Photographer) where he worked to secure and develop the IWM’s photographic collections and documented the evolution of commemorative activities. Nicholls’ archive is now dispersed and little known, preserved as part of the Royal Photographic Society collection (pre-1914), by the IWM (for the period 1914-36), and by the Horace Nicholls estate. This project will examine these three collections to properly evaluate Nicholls’ achievements, the influences that drove him and the significance of his legacy.

Candidate requirements:

Applicants should have a good undergraduate degree in a relevant discipline, satisfy AHRC eligibility requirements including Masters-level advanced research training or equivalent, and be able to demonstrate an active interest in the history of photography, journalism or some aspect of the visual media.

Funding:

Subject to AHRC eligibility criteria, the scholarships cover tuition fees and a grant (stipend) towards living expenses. The value of the stipend for 2016/17 is yet to be confirmed. However, it is likely to be £14,296 plus £550 additional stipend payment for Collaborative Doctoral Students. For more information visit: http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/skills/phdstudents/fundingandtraining. In addition, the student is eligible to receive up to £1,000 a year from IWM and £1,000 a year from the University of Brighton towards research expenses.

How to apply:

Applicants should submit via email a curriculum vitae (no more than 2 pages), a sample of writing, a brief letter outlining their qualification for the studentship, and the names and contact details of two academic referees to Emily Peirson-Webber, Research Manager, IWM (research@iwm.org.uk) no later than 5pm on Thursday 7th April 2016. Please ensure the subject line of your email appears as ‘surname, first name – IWM/Brighton studentship.’

Contacts:

Interviews are scheduled to be held in London the week beginning 25th April 2016. Shortlisted candidates will be asked to complete an application to the College of Art and Humanities Doctoral Programme at the University of Brighton. For further information please contact Emily Peirson-Webber (EPeirson-Webber@iwm.org.uk | 020 7416 5461).

Deadline for applications: 5pm on Thursday 7th April 2016

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SCIENCE MEETS ART ASPECTS OF 175 YEARS OF PHOTOGRAPHY IN DEVON

THE DEVONSHIRE ASSOCIATION

SCIENCE MEETS ART

ASPECTS OF 175 YEARS OF PHOTOGRAPHY IN DEVON

The Association’s President, Dr Tom Greeves*, invites you to his Presidential Symposium (non-members are welcome)

Saturday 9 April 2016. 9.30am (Registration) – 4.30pm Petroc College, Mid Devon Campus, Bolham Road, Tiverton EX16 6SH

The seemingly magical process of capturing an image on a light-sensitive surface entranced the Victorian age. This new science and artform, which became known as photography, was created by pioneers from the 1830s onwards. By the late 1850s numerous photographic studios had been established in the county. This symposium is the first time that a public day event has been devoted to exploring photography in Devon. Its crossover between Science and Art exactly fits the aims of the Devonshire Association, and the programme will reflect this. The morning will include exciting new work on pioneers of photography in Devon, and on the remarkable topographical work in the county of one of the finest national photographers of the mid-19th century, and of his contemporaries. There will also be a challenge to identify Devon scenes photographed in the 1860s as studies for nationally renowned artists. James Davies will give a presentation on the official recording of buildings within the county. The afternoon will start with a look at the revelatory landscape and social record of Chris Chapman and the late James Ravilious from the 1970s onwards. The day will come full circle with presentations from three contemporary internationally respected artistphotographers inspired by Devon – Garry Fabian Miller, Susan Derges and Jem Southam – whose camera-less techniques or equipment echo that of the very earliest practitioners. Much of the rich visual material and information will be presented for the first time, and the important role of photography in Devon will be more than amply demonstrated. [*Dr Tom Greeves is a cultural environmentalist who has devoted much of his life to the study of archaeology and history of Devon. His photographic books include A Dartmoor Century 1883-1882 (1983); Tin Mines & Miners of Dartmoor (1986); Dartmoor (2004); and Dartmoor’s Earliest Photographs: Landscape & Place 1860-1880 (2015). He hopes that this symposium will provide the stimulus for the long overdue creation of a Photography section within the Devonshire Association.]

PROGRAMME  (some titles are provisional)

09.30 Registration (canteen available from 09.00)

10.00 Tom Greeves – President of the Devonshire Association Welcome

10.05 James Ryan – University of Exeter Photographic Pioneers in Plymouth c. 1839-1845

10.30 Nigel Overton – Plymouth Museum Early Amateurs and Studios 1850s-1860s 11.00 Coffee

11.30 Peter James – Curator of Photography Collections, Library of Birmingham William Sherlock: ‘Possibly but not Conclusively’

12.00 Tom Greeves – President of the Devonshire Association Francis Bedford & his Peers – Landscape Photography in Devon in the 1860s & 1870s

12.30 James Davies – Head of Imaging, Historic England The Official Recording of Devon’s Buildings

13.00 Lunch 1

4.00 Chris Chapman Two Photographers in Devon – James Ravilious and Chris Chapman

14.30 Garry Fabian Miller Exposure. Dartmoor – a Site for Light and Weather

15.00 Susan Derges Rivers, Brooks and Streams – Photography and the Imagination 15.30 Jem Southam What is a river?

16.00 Conclusion

16.10 Tea

16.30 Departure

http://www.devonassoc.org.uk/whats-on/20160409-Science-meets-art.pdf

Horace Nicholls: artist-photographer at war – AHRC studentship in collaboration with Imperial War Museums (IWM) and University of Brighton

Applications are invited for an AHRC-funded PhD at the University of Brighton: “Horace Nicholls: artist-photographer at war”. This is offered under the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership programme. The partner institutions are the University of Brighton and IWM. The studentship will be supervised by Professor Darren Newbury and Professor Francis Hodgson at the University of Brighton, and Hilary Roberts of IWM London. This full-time studentship, which is funded for three years at standard AHRC rates, will begin on 1 October 2016.

The Project

Horace W. Nicholls was one of Britain’s best known photographers of the early twentieth century. As one of the world’s first true photojournalists, his work shaped that of succeeding generations. Nicholls reported the 2nd Anglo-Boer War in South Africa. He established legal copyright in photographs in a landmark court case in 1901. He documented the impact of total war on the British people, and, as Britain’s first official photographer on the Home Front, had unique access, particularly to women war workers. After the war, he became the new Imperial War Museum’s Head of Studio (Chief Photographer) where he worked to secure and develop the IWM’s photographic collections and documented the evolution of commemorative activities. Today, many of Nicholls’ photographs are familiar but little is known about the man who took them. There has been no significant research, publication or exhibition of his work for forty years. 2017 will be the 150th anniversary of the birth of Horace W. Nicholls and the centenary of his appointment as the first Ministry of Information Home Front official photographer in the First World War. It is also the centenary of IWM’s request to Government that he create a photographic essay of women’s contribution to the war effort.

Horace Nicholls’ archive, comprising photographs, sketches, documents and printed materials, is now dispersed and little known – a factor which has contributed to his disappearance from public view. The archive is preserved as part of the Royal Photographic Society collection (pre-1914), by the IWM (for the period 1914-36), and by the Horace Nicholls estate. This project will examine these three collections in the context of the First World War centenary; properly evaluate the achievements of Horace Nicholls; the influences that drove him; and the significance of his legacy in terms of:

  1. The evolution of photography as an international mass medium, a form of international propaganda and commemorative medium.
  2. The development of professional photojournalism.
  3. Photography’s capacity to act simultaneously as a medium of art and information and the consequences of this tension for contemporary understanding of the meaning of modern conflict.
  4. Public understanding of the impact of war on civilians in the early twentieth century.
  5. IWM’s early activities as a collector/commissioner of photography.

Funding

Subject to AHRC eligibility criteria, the scholarships cover tuition fees and a grant (stipend) towards living expenses. The value of the stipend for 2016/17 is yet to be confirmed. However, it is likely to be £14,296 plus £550 additional stipend payment for Collaborative Doctoral Students. For more information visit this funding guide. In addition, the student is eligible to receive up to £1,000 a year from IWM and £1,000 a year from the University of Brighton towards research expenses.

How to apply

Applicants should submit via email a curriculum vitae (no more than 2 pages), a sample of writing, a brief letter outlining their qualification for the studentship, and the names and contact details of two academic referees to Emily Peirson-Webber, Research Manager, IWM (research@iwm.org.uk) no later than 5pm on Thursday 7 April 2016. Please ensure the subject line of your email appears as ‘surname, first name – IWM/Brighton studentship.’

Interviews are scheduled to be held in London the week beginning 25th April 2016. Shortlisted candidates will be asked to complete an application to the College of Art and Humanities Doctoral Programme at the University of Brighton. For further information please contact Emily Peirson-Webber (EPeirson-Webber@iwm.org.uk | 020 7416 5461).

Applicants should have a good undergraduate degree in a relevant discipline, satisfy AHRC eligibility requirements including Masters-level advanced research training or equivalent, and be able to demonstrate an active interest in the history of photography, journalism or some aspect of the visual media.

Applicants must be a resident of the UK or European Economic Area (EEA). In general, full studentships are available to students who are settled in the UK and have been ordinarily resident for a period of at least three years before the start of postgraduate studies. Fees-only awards are generally available to EU nationals resident in the EEA. International applicants are normally not eligible to apply for this studentship.

Deadline for applications: 5pm on Thursday 7 April 2016

 

http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/research/doctoral-centre-arts/studentships/horace-nicholls-artist-photographer-at-war

Julia Margaret Cameron Symposium

The Julia Margaret Cameron Symposium held on 20th January 2016 consisted of eight ten minute papers by scholars who have written about Cameron, curated exhibitions of her work, or are examining her influence upon other photographers and considering the impact of her intellectual connections, as well as opening up conversations about her colonial work in Ceylon and challenging our own views on colonialism more generally.  The Bodleian Library (specifically the Weston library) was chosen as a site for the symposium due to the small but significant collection of Cameron works owned by Oxford University.

https://madeleineemeraldthiele.wordpress.com/2016/02/11/julia-margaret-cameron-symposium/

DMU’s acclaimed photographic historians to take over national airwaves for BBC

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/about-dmu/news/2015/february/dmus-acclaimed-photographic-historians-to-take-over-national-airwaves-for-bbc-series.aspx

 

Academics from DMU’s world-renowned Photographic History Research Centre (PHRC) are set to take over the national airwaves.

The PHRC is presenting a series called The Five Photographs That (you didn’t know) Changed Everything as part of BBC Radio 3’s acclaimed The Essay feature.

xray-hand-inset

REVOLUTIONARY: The first X-ray photograph will be discussed by Dr Kelley Wilder on Monday evening

It will introduce a national audience to the study of photographic history and the work of the centre, which is home to the largest concentration of photographic historians in Europe.

PHRC director Professor Elizabeth Edwards devised the series and invited colleagues and PHRC collaborators around the world to take part.

The week begins on Monday, February 16 with Dr Kelley Wilder, DMU’s Reader in Photographic History, talking about the first X-ray.
 It will be followed by:

•    Dr Oman Nasim, of the University of Kent, on how a photo of a nebula changed our views of the universe and our place in it
•    Dr Jeanne Haffner, of Harvard University, on aerial photography
•    Professor Elizabeth Edwards on how amateur photographers helped change the way a nation viewed itself
•    Dr Jennifer Tucker of Wesleyan University, USA, on the photo which changed the law

Prof Edwards said: “When they first approached us, they were’nt clear what they wanted, except it wasn’t five great moments in photo journalism.

“What we have given them are photographs that themselves are events and that themselves show how photography that has changed the way people live in and think about their world –  the shape of the galaxy we inhabit, and diagnose disease from inside the body –  which we now take for granted.”

Dr Kelley Wilder added: “Hopefully, it [the series] will show that this medium – which has changed enormously since 1839 – is still here, still current and is still powerful. We are all very passionate about the role of the photography in defining and documenting our lives.”

– See more at: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/about-dmu/news/2015/february/dmus-acclaimed-photographic-historians-to-take-over-national-airwaves-for-bbc-series.aspx#sthash.N9L1b9U0.dpuf

Further activity History and Theory of Photography Research Centre Birkbeck, University of London,

Free and open to all, at 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD, unless otherwise specified

Wednesday 9 March 2016 – 6-7:30
*Clore Building, Room B01, Torrington Square (opposite main building), WC1E 7HX
Jennifer Tucker (Wesleyan University & Birkbeck Institute for Humanities Visiting Fellow)
Picturing Modernization: Vision, Modernity and the Technological Image in Humphrey Jenning’s Pandaemonium

Thursday 9 June 2016, 6-7:30 pm
Room 112
Luke Gartlan (University of St. Andrews, Editor of History of Photography journal)
Before ‘White Australia’: The Singleton Family Photo Albums and Early Australian-Japanese Relations

Monday 27 June 2016, 6-7:30 pm
Room 112
Tim Satterthwaite
Spiritualising the machine: the modernist photography of UHU magazine

Saturday 2 July 2016 times and location TBC
Workshop
Law and Photography
In collaboration with London School of Economics

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/arts/research/photography